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Author: Brittany Robson, Communications and Relationships Intern

A personal take on Vita Cochran’s embroidered splendour by Marketing and Communications Intern, Brittany Robson

They are so substantial.

I searched for that word for a while, and it still doesn’t seem quite fitting. When I look at them I just feel this strong pull towards them. I want to reach my hands out and run them over the stitching, feeling the curve of each line of thread, each one nestled alongside the other.

POCKET HISTORIES EXHIBITION VIEW. PHOTO CREDIT SAM HARTNETT. COURTESY TE URU Scalene (2016), Nonagon (2018), Varvara (2017)

POCKET HISTORIES EXHIBITION VIEW. PHOTO CREDIT SAM HARTNETT. COURTESY TE URU Scalene (2016), Nonagon (2018), Varvara (2017)

Vita Cochran’s embroidered artworks are fascinating to me. I’ve always had a love for fashion and a similar love for art and craft making, so herein lies the reason behind my obsession with Vita’s pieces. She’s a ‘maker,’ a lovely and broad word for a creative/artist, one which encompasses her many skills and slashes, and she creates beautiful embroidered designs on textiles.

Her works in Pocket Histories (on now at The Dowse until Janurary 9) are colourful, geometric and substantial, the textural and material qualities of her works create an incredibly tangible quality to her works. These qualities radiate so strongly that the “no touching” sign appears seemingly necessary— I almost fell victim to the works’ magnetism myself, my brain had to stop my hand as it floated upwards to trace the bright lines.

There’s a certain type of person who would carry or wear an item made by Vita Cochran- they have short dark hair that glistens with the reddish tones of hair dye; she wears mostly black but sometimes will wear an outfit of full printed colour, they’re talented at layering. Vita’s items go with both version of this person’s style. If they wear glasses, the frames are thick and circular.

I can’t give you an in depth analysis of her work, but I can tell you how it makes me feel. It brings me joy coupled with a sense of calmness, my eyes follow the neat rows that begin and end exactly where they are meant to. I think my real satisfaction and adoration of Vita’s works comes from looking at things that are evidentiary of craft, where you can visualise or see the evidence of the creative process, not necessarily understanding that process, but appreciating the psychological and physical steps that lead to the product in front of you.

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