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A Season of Import

Author: Alex Grace, Communications and Relationships Manager

This year The Dowse Art Museum is presenting a programme of exhibitions that illuminate many important conversations taking place in our world.

The second half of 2017 will see The Dowse highlight Fiona Clark’s important photographic series Te iwi o te wahi kore from its collection; show a new work made specifically for our galleries by respected sculptor Maureen Lander; present a touring survey of Australian artist Nicholas Mangan’s work, also shown in Melbourne and Berlin; and debut the major exhibition Gavin Hipkins: The Domain, a survey of 25 years’ work by this leading New Zealand artist.

The Colony installed Sao Paulo Biennale, 2002

The Colony installed Sao Paulo Biennale, 2002

The Dowse Director Courtney Johnston said, “We are charged with serving our community—this includes resident of and visitors to Lower Hutt. Our exhibitions show how art grows out of and feeds back into our conversations as communities, large and small.”

“A visit to The Dowse should be a beautiful, stimulating and surprising visual experience. A visit should also be a work-out for curious minds. This season we are presenting exhibitions that meaningfully contribute to all sorts of conversations happening outside our walls: what we draw from and what we do to our natural environment; how language defines the way we navigate the world; the complex global political and economic networks our lives are lived within.”

“The year will be capped by our large scale survey, Gavin Hipkins: The Domain. This show carries us through summer with style and substance. Known as a ‘tourist of photography’, in his 25-year career Hipkins has not only explored the vast formal opportunities photography offers as a medium, but also how social and political ideologies visually shape the world we inhabit.”

The Dowse’s exhibition programme is underpinned by a commitment to bringing the best of Aotearoa New Zealand’s art to Lower Hutt and the Wellington region. This season’s shows are sure to challenge, refresh and delight audiences. With such a selection on offer each visit to The Dowse will be a journey of discovery and exploration.

 

Exhibition information

He Taonga Te Reo
17 June – 1 October 2017

Māori language is integral to Māori culture, and opens the door to a Māori perspective on the world. Featuring a range of works from The Dowse’s collection, the exhibition He Taonga Te Reo looks at how language is an expression of identity, beliefs and values; how it defines our way of navigating the world.

Rangi Kipa, Navigator, Collection of The Dowse Art Museum, purchased 2009

Rangi Kipa, Navigator, Collection of The Dowse Art Museum, purchased 2009

Fiona Clark: Te iwi o te wahi kore
15 July – 29 October 2017

Reading like a photo essay, this exhibition and the series of photographs it is drawn from positions kai moana as a taonga, which is also at risk of disappearing. These photographs are the result of Clark’s lengthy consultation with Ngātiawa and Te Atiawa, and shows the care, gathering, preparation and eating of seafood as an intrinsic part of their daily life.

FIONA CLARK, COLLECTING ON WAIONGANA FOR A LARGE HUI, 1979–1982. COLLECTION OF THE DOWSE ART MUSEUM

FIONA CLARK, COLLECTING ON WAIONGANA FOR A LARGE HUI, 1979–1982. COLLECTION OF THE DOWSE ART MUSEUM

Maureen Lander: Flat-Pack Whakapapa
15 July – 29 October 2017

Just as whakapapa (genealogy) reflects someone’s lineage and biology, the starting line of a kete determines how its patterning and size will develop. In Flat-Pack Whakapapa, Maureen Lander will create three installations that explore the connections between whakapapa and raranga (Māori weaving).

Maureen Lander, Whiri Commencement (Whakapapa) for Flat-Pack Whakapapa (Work In Progress), 2017. Courtesy of the Artist

Maureen Lander, Whiri Commencement (Whakapapa) for Flat-Pack Whakapapa (Work In Progress), 2017. Courtesy of the Artist

HandShake 3: Reflect
5 Aug – 3 Dec

The word ‘reflect’ can mean both to mimic and cast back, or to respond. In this exhibition 12 jewellers, who are a part of the Handshake project, have been invited to draw connections between the term reflect and the self-reflexive nature of contemporary jewellery, which both embraces and counteracts its traditional and commercial counterparts.

Handshake is a contemporary jewellery exchange where early career New Zealand makers are paired up with established, internationally based mentors.

Sarah Read and Liesbeth den Besten, On Jewelleryness Touch, 2016. Digital print and rub-to-reveal ink on palight board. Courtesy of the artist. Photo Kelly McDonald

Sarah Read and Liesbeth den Besten, On Jewelleryness Touch, 2016. Digital print and rub-to-reveal ink on palight board. Courtesy of the artist. Photo Kelly McDonald

Nicholas Mangan: Limits to Growth
19 Aug – 5 Nov

This is the first survey exhibition of Melbourne-based artist Nicholas Mangan. Mangan's work addresses a range of themes, including the ongoing impacts of colonialism, humanity's relationship with the natural environment, consumptive cultures and the complex dynamics of the global political economy. The exhibition and publication Nicholas Mangan: Limits to Growth is co-produced by Monash University Museum of Art, Melbourne; Institute of Modern Art, Brisbane; and Kunst-Werke Institute for Contemporary Art, Berlin.

Chief Magistrate Anghel Gargog in costume wearing basket near two coral money discs, 1962. Photographer Roy H. Goss. National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C

Chief Magistrate Anghel Gargog in costume wearing basket near two coral money discs, 1962. Photographer Roy H. Goss. National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C

Gavin Hipkins: The Domain
18 Nov 2017 – 11 Mar 2018

New Zealand artist Gavin Hipkins’ career is characterised by a remarkable fluidity, spanning a wide range of photographic media, from slide transparencies to photograms and moving image.

The Domain will be an expansive survey of Hipkins’ work, bringing together 25 years of art-making. It will reveal an ever-evolving practice which returns again and again a set of core concerns: photography as the predominant form of modernist visual communication; the nation state and national identity; exploration and colonisation in the modern era; how social and political ideologies visually shape the world we live in.

The Colony installed Sao Paulo Biennale, 2002

The Colony installed Sao Paulo Biennale, 2002

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